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the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
the united states. you must be tired. you sit, i'll talk. you listen. and so i did. then he said this. and he repeated it again and again. where is american leadership? we need american leadership. where is american leadership? then he'd talk about a region of the world and what was happening in that region. then he'd say where is american leadership? then he'd go to another region and talk about the challenges there. where is american leadership? the world has always looked to us as the shining city on the hill. that light looks dimmer. we keep kicking the challenges down the road and hope someone else will deal with it. that time is now ours. this is the greatest generation that left us this nation so prosperous and so free. now it's our turn. they've held the torch alost for the whole world to see. a torch of freedom, opportunity and hope. they're getting fewer and further between, the greatest generation. they can't hold it quite as high as they used to. it's our turn to grab the torch. when i became president -- [ cheers and applause ] -- we're going to do what we have to do, we're going
, the united states is falling behind those countries. he said that the united states needs to be doing better than europe. that's one of his big go-to lines. europe is not working for europe. it isn't going to work here in the united states. so these two campaigns are going to be going at it over the economy. we heard president obama throw out a very attack line talking about the mother jones video that came out. he said in front of that crowd, he said when i look out at this crowd i don't see a lot of victims, referring to what mitt romney said in that hidden camera video. they're talking about defense stuff. but the economy looming o everything else. >> thank you, jim. appreciate it as always. president obama and mitt romney face to face. first presidential debate wednesday night. watch it live, 7:00 eastern or cnn.com. >>> also another huge story that has everybody talking. no kidding. the nfl and its refs. right now nfl commissioner roger goodell is taking questions at a presser in new york. let's see what he's got to say. >> -- and on their side why, and if there was a problem with full-
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
. it is the overtime that jews as a class have been expelled from anywhere in the united states. and around 1982, new information concerning the order had he come available from the association that published ulysses s. grant's papers. and so i began to prepare my remarks i put on the new suit and my talk seemed to be going well until i approached the subject of smuggling. ulysses s. grant was completely concerned about the north and the south. and since some of the smugglers that these troops caught were jews, he concluded that all jews or smugglers. that pointed out that we now know that smuggling was rampant was by no means a jewish monopoly. the continued rants own father, jesse grant was engaged in a clandestine scheme to move southern cotton northway. his partner was a jewish clothing manufacture and send them back. no sterner with those words out of my mouth and began to shift uneasily in the room and the pioneering of the american jewish historian buried his face in his hands. it was out of this world. i said something went terribly wrong. so the archives i didn't know what the problem was. s
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
is unthinkable. and devastating. and when i become president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with leaders who writeoff half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% of the people vote for the president no matter what. who -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's secretly recorded remarks into a devastating new ad claiming the gop nominee's words under the families and veterans. >> so my job is not to worry about -- they should take personal responsibility. >> romney two days in a row out to link national security to the nati sluggh recovery. he's seizing on new economic data revising down the 2nd quarter gdp. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china's growing much faster than we. russia's growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> but not all the numbers
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
shakes the resolve of the united states of america. >> earlier today secretary of state hillary clinton stepped up her criticism of the anti-muslim film that first prompted the protests. >> to us, to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensib reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. >> joining me now live from cairo, nbc's similar maceda. give us the best description of how things are right now. >> reporter: well, ironically benghazi remained calm today. if you look at it, perhaps the libyan government's quick crackdown there on those alleged perpetrators. four individuals were arrested today. there's a manhunt going on that might have had a tamping-down effort. even there in benghazi, the u.s. government is taking no chances. we understand that all u.s. personnel has now been or have been evacuated to tripoli and only emergency staff are kept at the embassy here. here in cairo it's another 24 hours of protests against that made in usa anti-islam film. overnight last night some dramatic scenes near the u.s
people. because the senate bill was inclusive and every woman member , republican, of the united states senate voted for it. everyone. that was the difference between the two bills. those who were included and a more specific group that are now included, which we think they ought to be, but we also think there aren't people include who had need to be. with all due respect i think my characterization was absolutely accurate. but it's interesting, mr. speaker, that we still haven't eabed the question -- answered the question. we tend to want to talk about other things. 98% of americans should not get a tax increase on january 1 that are making less than $250,000 individually as a family. i think we agree on that. mr. speaker, now i haven't heard that we don't agree on that but we agree on that which means there are 2% on which we do not agree. and that bill has not been brought to the floor that passed the united states senate dealing with that 98%. or 97% of small business. now, mr. speaker, it seems to me if we have agreement on 98% and the president of the united states will sign that
offered in the united states. in fact, in the world. and net, it is a very under-utilized program. no matter how hard we try to market it and sell it to our employees as a great resource, many people do not take advantage of it. it may be because it is viewed as, sort of, mental health. that -- what if my colleagues found out. so this is where corporate culture that walked the talk on health-seeking behavior can really make a difference. i learned this in my role. that's when i tell my -- why i tell my story. i tell my story to my employees, too. i say it is ok, because i believe you all need to seek whatever help you need to seek to be able to help with well being and also to do what's necessary to prevent suicide. and it really can make a difference. we have designed a comprehensive and effective suicide prevention program. we make a wide array of resources available to our members, employees, family members, to our clients' employees and family members, especially advocating for individuals to know when and how to seek help. this is available as well in the -- on the -- in the
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
that open new plants and train new workers right here in the united states of america we can reward those companies that build right here and double their exports. we can create 1 million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. you can make that happen. >> i want to create a future where everyone who wants a job can find a job. where no senior figures for their security of their retirement and every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads to a good job and a bright horizon. and unlike the president, i have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. host: has either campaign in specific on how they plan to create 1 million new jobs? politics is not my area, but from what i have followed i have not seen at all specifically this is going to happen. its romney's plan, one of five. is to reduce the deficit. but it is not clear how it leads to more jobs in a direct way. obviously, overall, a strong quake -- stronger economy and reduced debt leads to a better economic environment. but as you cut contractors, teachers, whatever -- anytime government is cutting spending, c
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
privilege as far as being a citizen of the united states to vote and be part of the process. that is all i have to say. host: frank newport, it sounded like from the comments last night by mitt romney that they were really focusing on from here on out approaching voters who had voted for obama in 2008 and looking to lure them to the romney campaign. is there any way that gallup will be checking that attempt? guest: absolutely straight -- absolutely. we track daily. for a republican to win, they have to pull back in some of those voters. if the same scenario happens this year that unfolded in 2008, obama is going to win again. republicans have two goals -- one is to activate the core republican voters and get them to turn out, which is easier for republicans and democrats, because republicans are more likely to vote. they have characteristics like age and education that make them more likely to vote. the second task is to pull down at 7% margin that obama had over mccain, so they have to come in to become a convert some of those people who went for obama to go to romney, or they were going
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
as proactive as it has been because there as been paralysis on the fiscal side in the united states. there really has not been any effort on the republican -- on the political side to do much about the job situation. the burden has fallen disproportionately on the central bank. with the too much government is the problem, that is a discussion we have been having since the beginning of time. host: unemployment by education level, 12% with those with high school education, with college, 6.6%. guest: people like to talk about the more education you have the less unemployment you have. unemployment has gone up for all of the groups. college graduates or not, people are struggling. you could have a large student loan and not find a job. host: we have a caller. go ahead. caller: how many of the jobs are jobs with which people can support themselves or their families? guest: you make a fair point. the unemployment rate is one measure of unemployment. there is also a measure that tries to take into account people who are working part time, but would rather be working full time. if you inclu
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
/11, and thanks to the is on the road to defeat and bin the united states of america. [applause] back. all the troops from bliss highlanders. deployed later this year. fight. you know this. ultimate sacrifice, including day last month. our message to them was this. we will honor them always. pushed the taliban back. month. war responsibly. lead for their own security. in 2014, the transition will be complete. never again. [applause] think about it. and afghanistan. thirds. home. and what does that mean for you? prepare for the future. your spouses and your kids. stronger. restore american leadership. don't you believe it. our alliances have never been gaddafi. leadership. top. [applause] incredible service. war, we are destroying terrorist leadership. proud that the united states is is more respected in the world. a pledge. have served us. in them. to your families. hey. [laughter] interest. when we do, we will give me the equipment and a clear mission to get the job done. [applause] world, bar none. superiority. [applause] to scare you. find a plan to reduce the including defense. threate
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
.s. debt, as is featured. unbelievable that the debt of the united states could be at risk. but there you have it. it's a big deal. and there is no particular magic wand. the truth is with elected leaders who have been unwilling to tell us we have to pay for what we ask for. so we haven't done it. the debt is now burdening our economy, our growth, our job creation. and, frankly, even our attitudes. it creates a coloration of the whole climate that says, don't take risks. you already own too much. you slow down in that regard, you slow down the ability to solve the problem. that's why we are today. a couple rules. as we begin this conversation to shift from a problem approach to solution approach. first of all, let's try to get our latest essay there are no quick fixes to that, and there are no absolutes, let's stop the exercise of saying i will never, i will never support a tax increase, i will never support a tax on social security or entitlements. all that does is delay the honesty, the ability to work together. we have to do what we have to do to fix the problem that we created. that's
howard taft was both supreme court chief justice and before that a president of the united states, came from cincinnati. cincinnati in some ways was a southern town because it was oriented, its trade was with the south along the ohio river and the mississippi. it also was the home of the underground railroad. so if you could get slaves -- the slaves could get out of kentucky and cross the ohio river, in some ways they were safe in ohio. and then they could be dispersed to other places where they were even safer in ohio. so taft was from here. harding was from marion, ohio, just north of columbus here. william mckinley who was elected president in 1896 was an ohioan. so a whole bunch of ohioans. james garfield, again, was an ohioan. he was a short-lived president because he was assassinated in office. but you have a set of presidents who came during this period, many many after the civil war all the way up into the 1920s. and then it sort of stops. they were pulling presidents from other parts of the country afterwards. they tend to be more moderate, for one thing. they don't tend to be
to fund programs all over the united states where we wouldn't only improve -- we wouldn't only build things that we need, but improve them. the american society of civil engineers has addressed this issue, mr. speaker. what they have said, 2.3 trillion of infrastructure maintenance needs to be done. i come from the city of minneapolis and in my city, we had a bridge fall into the mississippi river. maintenance in this country is critical. we have bridges that are old and deteriorating all over this country. we have bridges that are in need of repair, roads as well, and we also have other projects that need to be taken care of, in terms of our grid and wastewater treatment, in terms of all types of important infrastructure. but we have not invested. we are relying on things that our grandparents gave us. we are relying on eisenhower-era infrastructure, because we haven't in our age focused on the needs of the american people to have infrastructure bill. just to talk a little bit more about the american jobs act, it would also extend cutting payroll taxes in half for 98% of businesses.
is suspending joint missions between the united states soldier and afghan soldiers with a growing number of insider attacks. what does this mean for the end of the war? or the war now? we have details from the pentagon. and the attack on diplomatic missions across the middle east putting foreign policy on the campaign trail controversial. the potential impact on the undecided voters coming up. a study suggests letting your kid take the occasional sip of alcohol may really not be the best way to stop your child from becoming a heavy drinker later on. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." but, first, from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the race if the white house. the republican presidential nominee, mitt romney, is responding today to a video shot in may during a private fundraiser. an attendee secretly recorded and it gave it to the liberal website "mother jones." in the video, he touches on everything from foreign policy to the economy. at one point he calls president obama supporters "people who are dependent upon the government who believe they
the obligations to the united nations. that is why the united states will do what we must to prevent a run from obtaining a nuclear weapon. lou: the president was careful in his language. radical islam not mentioned once in his speech even though there is convincing evidence and a consensus that it was not an attack carried out by terrorists with links by al qaeda if not led by al qaeda. president obama did defend israel in the context of the 2-dissolution the palestine. president obama did not use the word allied to it specifically describe our relationship with the jewish state. the president refused one-on-one meetings with any of the world leaders. this is the same man who, as a candidate, pledged to, more than four years ago, the with our enemies without preconditions. he criticized the bush administration's unilateralism. >> the notion that i am not talking to countries is punishment to them which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. lou: we will be examining the guiding principles of president obama's foreign-policy tonight with armed services c
and a white america and latino america and asian america. there's a united states of america. >> eight years after the keynote that launched his national career, four years after becoming the nation's first african-american nominee, tonight president barack obama accepts the nomination a second time. tonight the president makes his case for four more years. >> four more years. >> america needs four more years. >> tonight more from the first lady, vice president biden, caroline kennedy, the foo fighters? yes, the foo fighters. weather moved tonight indoors. but after a first night owned by michelle obama, after a second night owned by president clinton, expectations for the finale are sky high. msnbc's primetime coverage of the democratic national convention's final night begins right now. >>> thank you for joining us. i'm rachel maddow here at msnbc headquarters in new york. i'm joined by ed shultz, melissa harris-perry, chris hayes, and the senior strategist steve schmidt. lawrence o'donnell and al sharpton will be joining us in a moment. leading us from the site of the convention is our co
in the united states, but done in france which is a modern labor market where i think there are some lessons. the code-talkers actually convinced the french government to do something i hope we can convince our -- co-authors actually convince the french government to do something i hope we can convince our government to do, which is to experiment with widespread unemployment services programs and look at what the effects on the labor market are not just by randomizing an individual having access to the program, but breaking france up into different geographic areas of labor markets and providing 100% of the people access in some areas, in some areas , in some areas 55%, some areas 25%. if you do that randomly, on average, if you're in an area where a lot of other people use this program, does that have a negative effect on you? what they found is in tight labor markets, basically the programs really helped people get into jobs more quickly. when the labor market is weak, is largely a game of musical chairs. one person getting a job makes another person have a more difficult time. thinking ab
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
investment, which, in turn, would lower the growth of incomes in the united states. and so, while we talk about growing the economy and economic growth and the need to get businesses around this country hiring again, at the same time there is a negative pressure being place odd them because congress can't do its job to control spending. $16 trillion in debt. you mentioned it was nearly $51,000 for every man, woman and child. we have a 10-month-old, he owes $51,000 as a share of the federal debt. $51,000 a piece. and that negative pressure, that mounting debt, deficits that are over $1 trillion a year, makes it moran more difficult for businesses to have access to the capital they need to grow and make it difficult for companies to operate because they find themselves competing with the federal government for those scares resources. next thing, the government will have to look at tax increases. and so the challenges our bases face, congress, can you get government out of the way so we can let america work and run our businesses the way we want to, not the way washington wants to. but at th
before about soaring oil prices and mitt romney and the plan to get the united states of america, energy independent by 2020. and the fact that the keystone pipeline locked by barack obama. off the coast of virginia, the obama administration is blocking the creation of new jobs and oil exploration, and the middle east and the strangle hold that the middle east has on our economy, will be a major issue in this election, and it's all about the economy. >> and it's all about the economy, and i want it know where we see mitt romney break out and take a convincing lead. and you said, incouple bent always lead at labor day, when does mitt romney jump out ahead. when? >> stuart, i think it's going to be a classic sweet 16 kind of final four matchup where you have an underdog, which clearly, any challenger, including mitt romney is an underdog that hits the three-point shot at the end and the grass roots win and we take our country back and that's how this is going to play out. >> i'm going to wait until october before i see a breakout. >> absolutely, and i did mix metaphors, basketball and foot
in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the dramatic highs and lows in the race for the white house. now in full swing with the conventions over in both campaigns laser focused on november. the spotlight had barely cooled for president obama's big night when the latest unemployment report cast a shadow over the democratics' post-convention glow. mitt romney called it the hangover to the party in charlotte. the labor department says u.s. employers added only 96,000 jobs in august, fewer than expected, although the jobless rate did fall to 8.1%. our chief business correspondent, ali velshi, is joining us now to take a closer look inside the numbers. ali, the unemployment rate went down, but that's not necessarily a positive development. explain what's going on. >> you know, i've said for years that it's just easier to look at the number of jobs created or lost as opposed to the unemployment rate. and i'll explain that to you in a second. but the number of jobs added in august was 96,000. now, if you look at the pattern o
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